Students

How to avoid the issue is another story, the important thing here is knowing what you want students to learn in this class and what ideas are explicitly outside the scope of the class, the most striking or relatives who may find it to students. The atomic-molecular interpretation of what happens may or may not be relevant, but it is in a class and should be left for later. Students can measure volumes of different objects, by contrast, is a skill that is needed to bring this class forward, but can not be developed in the course of that lack of time is, therefore, something learned in previous classes. STEP 2. How do I tell if the students achieved the goals set? For each of the goals we've proposed in step 1, we must be able to describe exactly how we will realize, preferably in a "measurable" (ie, whether fully or partially achieved), whether students have met the target . Stan Kroenke wanted to know more.

As explained above, the idea is to establish specific guidelines, not general or vague, allowing us to establish with greater certainty if the students can come to that understanding or not. Remember that students can become skilled in the ability to repeat scholarly terminology but it seems superficial and hollow. Preferably we set things that we want the students to do and are not merely invitations to paraphrase what was said. Overall, look for that may explain (in his own words) physical phenomena in which expansion is involved, and can predict what will happen in a situation, whether theoretical or practical, where there is a phenomenon of expansion.